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by Dessert Professional | The Magazine Online

I've got a great formula that works well in an 8" or 9" spring form pan. My client has upped her servings for a wedding dessert buffet and would like this item in a 12" size. This cake is not your typical flour based cake and is soft centered. I am concerned about an even bake, when taking this up to a 12" - and not using a core. I'm afraid it may end up with crisp edges and a still raw middle.

Should I be concerned - or go confidently forward? Anyone successful with larger sizes of this cake?

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I once tried a bete noir recipe in a 12" removable bottom cheesecake pan (because I don't have springforms).  It was ok; I seem to recall it wanted desperately to crack in half because it was just too big.

One thing you can do is either bake in a water bath if you aren't already; or use a magi-cake strip to shield the outside...

Why not bake 2 8" or 9" ones?  I think I'd rather go that route than find out the hard way the 12" didn't bake as well as it could have....

You can try placing it in a Water bath or even putting a pan of water in the oven to keep it moist

Thanks for the responses. I ended up using a removable bottom cake pan with a slightly lower oven temp. In addition to buttering, and putting parchment on the bottom of the pan, I also lined the sides with strips of parchment. I then used two layers of Magic Strips. It was perfect.

In terms of doing two smaller ones instead of the large one - not entirely my call, and I did suggest it. I work with wedding coordinators and we had specific plates, limited display space and service, and needed to make it all work.

Water baths are a thing of the past for me for cakes or cheese cakes. No matter what I have done to protect and prevent - I ALWAYS get a wet crust. I learned a technique from a woman who rented time in my kitchen briefly, when trying to start a cheesecake company. Her cheesecakes were perfection - every single time. Beautiful texture and dolor - never a crack, and always clean - and crisp dry crusts. 

Her secret was to line the pan with the parchment strips - and prebake the crust. After cooling and filling, she baked them in a 150 degree oven for 90 ish minutes. Once just set, she turned off the oven and vented it - not opening the door until completely cool. 

In regards to a wet crust with a water bath, I did see in a past issue of Dessert Professional a removable bottom cake pan that is designed with a silicon gasket to prevent water seepage and apparently it also eliminates the need to wrap pans, I have not tried the pans out but it did look like an interesting concept. One thing I have tried with success was to use a food grade plastic bag that I doubled up instead of plastic wrap. The thicker plastic held out the water, no wet crust.

Intteresting - I have never tried plastic wrap. it was always the foil method and springform pans. The new pans with silicone seal do sound interesting. I just might try your bag idea some time. Thanks!

Happy it worked out for you. For us we share and oven with the entire kitchen, don't have the option of turning off and cooling completely. Our ovens run 22 hours a day. I only dream of having my own oven.

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